UGA Research Magazine :: Female sex offenders: Most were victims first - female sex offenders and susan strickland

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Feb 05, 2008 · Few studies have investigated the characteristics of female sex offenders and factors and/or causes of female deviance. Research to date has been descriptive in nature, with few comparison studies. Using a correlational design and three valid instruments, female sexual offenders and a matched group of female nonsexual offenders are compared in the areas of personality disorders, chemical Cited by: 115. Feb 05, 2008 · Using a correlational design and three valid instruments, female sexual offenders and a matched group of female nonsexual offenders are compared in the areas of personality disorders, chemical dependency, childhood trauma, sexual trauma, emotional neediness, cognitive distortions, and social competence.Cited by: 115.

Susan Strickland School of Social Work. Female sex offenders: Most were victims first. By Sam Fahmy. A UGA study that is the first to systematically examine a large sample of women child molesters shows that many were themselves victims of sexual abuse as children. Due to the smaller proportion of female sex offenders (2%-12% of all sexual offenses) compared with male sex offenders, we know much less about these women to aid in the assessment, treatment, and Author: Susan M Strickland.

Created Date: 5/15/2013 2:48:48 PM. Dr. Susan Strickland is a Internist in Lehigh, FL. Find Dr. Strickland's phone number, address, insurance information, hospital affiliations and more. Female sex offenders: exploring issues of.

Female Sex Offenders: Exploring Issues of Personality, Trauma, and Cognitive Distortions. Strickland, Susan M. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, v23 n4 p474-489 2008. Few studies have investigated the characteristics of female sex offenders and factors and/or causes of female deviance. Research to date has been descriptive in nature, with few Cited by: 115. A Comparative Study of Female Sex Offenders and Female Offenders Susan M. Strickland, PhD, University of Georgia. Since the 1960s, the rate of female crime has risen steadily, and at a higher rate than male crime (Flowers, 1995). During the ten-year span of 1993 to 2002, all crime, and violent crime in particular, has declined (FBI, 2002).